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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
WETA
Nov 14, 2012 11:00pm EST
likely to be nominated? and how would that have gone over among foreign policy experts? >> well, i think-- i mean, it's-- i think you have john kerry, or you have susan rice. and i think either one of them could be nominated and probably the foreign policy establishment would say that's fine. john kerry probably has more, but susan rice has served as u.n. ambassador and she's got know a lot of foreign experience, certain, from that experience. she's been at the state department before, too. i mean, her history is in foreign policy. she hasn't opinion secretary of state. he hasn't been on the hill in the capacity john kerry is, but she certainly is experienced. >> reporter: the aforementioned general petraeus, a story that continues to rock this town. the president talked about it at the press conference, said it was a sad personal saga. actually said very nice things about david petraeus' contributions to his country, and also said-- i'm not sure the exact word he used-- but basically no top vent intelligence was revealed. >> i think he made a point of saying so far. and so far, th
WETA
Nov 16, 2012 12:00pm EST
chinese economy and the chinese foreign policy, the military has a larger role and wrapped themselves in the flag of patriotism and corruption against the u.s. and on the taiwan issue and against japan, so the congress has taken place against a backdrop of rising military influence. >> rose:. >> and if i could ask richard on that to me it was a sign of some kind of order in the chinese process, rather than disorder to have this clean handover, the chairman of the military commission of not having jintao hang around for a year or two, it is a modest step of transparency and institutionalization? >> i think you can definitely argue that this basically reflects well on the system, they don't have the former leading hanging on by his fingernails in another important post, that is true. but -- and that is why some people compliment jintao for respecting the process but in ordinary power politics term, it certainly shows that jintao was a much weaker leader than we thought. >> we have never seen foreign policy statements from li keqiang be, scituate. >> we don't know how assertive the military
WETA
Nov 9, 2012 12:00am EST
less than a year later. and the foreign policy effects and the economic effects which we are still living. so we don't really know because history's like this what the real number one foreign policy is going to be. we can guess. we have educated guesses but things happen that we don't anticipate. that's where the arab spring. september 11 and its implications. i would just argue that's why the character of whoever wins this election is so important. foreign policy, as clinical as we want it to be in many ways is a human undertaking. >> rose: this is very important. what do you mean by character. help us understand what character has to do in terms of what are we talking about. character with respect to the presidency. >> i think we saw in 2001 we had a president who had a stubborn streak, who had, was in a way radicalized by events in the autumn of 2001. >> rose: 9/11. >> he was against nation building before he was in favor of it. and because of the effects of that we are living in a world which is radically different. the great example would be world war ii where fdr said i'm a j
WETA
Nov 12, 2012 5:00pm EST
long argument, the area of greatest continuity in u.s. foreign policy since the time of nixon has been our dealings with china. where, on the one hand, we think it's better if they grow than if they don't. on the other hand, we have all sorts of problems with them. i think that is the way obama has pursued it and will keep pursuing it. so i think they actually are relieved to have a second term. >> what do they want from us? >> they want essentially a chance to develop. i -- >> you mean develop economically? >> develop economically. and just to sort of breathe. when i lived in japan, i was quite alarmed, and remain so, about sort of the zero-sumness of many of japan's economic ambitions, which sort of came out of american achievement. in china's case, i think it's different. it's a gigantic poor country where most people are still poor. the per capita income is still, like, one-fifth what it is in the united states. a lot of really rich people, but still they have more farmers than we have people. and it's a giant challenge. and so i think what they want is it's better for them fo
WETA
Nov 8, 2012 6:00pm EST
years ago, maybe more, separating economic policy, jobs policy, foreign policy. it is all woven into the same fabric. you cannot talk about any one of those without talking about the rest of them. amerigas to bring a skill set to the next generation. -- america house to bring a skill sets to the next generation. we have to be a competitive generation. the amount of power is probably unprecedented in the world today. that does not mean that america is getting weaker. that should be good news to us. we have to rebuild our infrastructure and so on, but we are capable of doing that. most of the world looks to us to lead with allies in relationships, not dictate, not occupy, but to bring leadership along where we can find common interests. >> let's hope you are right. thank you so much. now to bravery and finally honored prepare. and -- finally honored. she was born into an indian family, but found herself working behind enemy lines tour world war ii. she was eventually captured and killed by the nazis. today, she is honored. here is a remarkable story. >> in a quiet london square where a you
WETA
Nov 13, 2012 6:30pm EST
obama having won, you have a more flexible foreign policy. >> uh-huh. >> so the prognosis so far looks positive because you have these two leadership groups who more or less are willing to accommodate, negotiate, and so forth and so on. but the problem in asia, of course, is that you have some very stubborn views. in the countries, japan, korea, vietnam, philippines, they're all disputing these islands, and it can get out of control. >> tom: mark, how long have you been investing in china or looking at china for capital? >> it has been over 30 years. >> tom: how would you describe today's opportunity over the course of that generation of vistain investing time? >> it is incredible. ever day you see opportunities in china. the demand for services, for products, you name it. they hunger for all of these things, and they will increase. it will not decrease, because of the wages going up. >> tom: we will have more of our conversation with mark mobius next week on thanksgiving night. he tells us globalization has made the u.s. fiscal cliff a worldwide issue for investors. >> susie: th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)